Tag Archives: Piercing

Fakir in Kodachrome

The good folks over at Yellow Beak Press (who put out some of the best tattoo history books on the market) sent SD a Kodachrome slide from the collection of photographer Bob Hanson last year; taken in the 1970s or early 1980s it features Fakir Musafar performing a then rare navel piercing.

Bob’s photos of the tattoo scene of the 70s/80s are highlighted in YBP’s Lost Love 2.

BSTA: Blake Perlingieri

Ari – Let’s start this off with your introduction to Fakir.

Blake – I got a hold of the ReSearch book in 1989 and it blew me away. Obviously it was the only cultural document at the time for an emerging subculture. There’s a lot of stuff in the book I was “meh” on but Fakir’s chapter really grabbed me. I was already piercing my friends in San Diego; people would go up to LA Gauntlet and buy a needle and barbell and I’d do them up in the park under a tree. My band had finally gotten signed and I came to this crossroad where I really wanted to do something meaningful and I knew I had a lot of learning to do so I quit the band and rolled up to San Francisco. The first time I went up there there was Body Manipulations – they were the first piercing studio in the area, they opened before Gauntlet. I went up and peeked at Body M and didn’t really know who they were but I recognized that the handsome guy out front leaning on his motorcycle having a cigarette was Vaughn. I knew he was the guy from the ReSearch book. I ended up making a couple of trips to San Francisco. My folks took me to the Gauntlet in the Castro and I went in, walked upstairs, and it was the first piercing shop I had ever been in. The term “piercer” didn’t exist yet – you were just a guy who did piercings at this time. I walked up and I said, “hey, my name is Blake and I am looking for Fakir and maybe some earrings!” I got the biggest attitude from the guy behind the counter. He didn’t even have visible piercings! He says “well we don’t have any jewelry in your size, honey.” I was like, “alright, fuck you,” and I started to walk out when I hear Fakir say “excuse me young man, I can help you!” I turn around and there he is with a porcupine quill in his septum. I just looked at him and told him he was the reason I came – but that I felt like this wasn’t a very welcoming place for me. At the time this was either summer or late 1990. Fakir took me to lunch. He put his arm around me and said, “well I have never seen the likes of you, young man., Tell me your story!” At the time I had 2” earlobes with huge dreadlocks- just a jungle kid from Southern California. How weird to walk into my first piercing shop to have some guy with no visible piercings be a dick to me. I was put off from the beginning. I didn’t consider myself professional at this time – I had only done genital and septum work. I had never done a nostril or navel. The stuff I was doing on my friends was all “Genesis P-Orridge” genitalia aesthetic. Fakir and I had an immediate connection and I told him I wanted to be a piercer. The first thing he said was, “well you sure don’t want to work at the Gauntlet, trust me.” I think we ate at Cafe Du Nord and it felt like I was coming home so to speak; he was just so welcoming. This is twenty-nine years ago. He literally says, “I think you’re doing something completely unique.” I didn’t understand his historical importance yet, I just intuitively knew he was the Granddaddy and if I was going to start a career I was going to go to the source. That’s a value that doesn’t exist anymore. There is a tattoo school is Vegas that cost $40,000 and guarantees you an internet following by the time you graduate, and you’ve only done like one tattoo. It shows you how ass backwards this culture is. The thing Fakir instilled in me in our first meeting – there were no personalities then, all I was was just a jungle kid, there was Gauntlet and Body M, that’s it for the whole US; there was no measure of what other people were doing. My experience at Gauntlet was very telling- Im sure they all had 00g PAs but they didn’t have the look I wanted to be a part of or was already doing, the things my grandmother introduced me to on her world travels. Continue reading

Color Grading. (NSFW)

By the time I finally click upload on the video that’s currently in my editing queue- a video that will clock in with a runtime of somewhere around the eighteen minute range- I’ll have spent roughly ten hours on task time for the final edit. Most of that will be spent color grading the footage, which was shot on VHS tape at Sailor Sid Diller’s Florida home/studio in 1985. Continue reading

HappyAppy

 

My search for a video of a rare dolphin piercing from BRAVO’s Mike Natali has been unsuccessful, but I’ve been finding lots of great video shot at his Brandon Florida shop in the mid/late 1990s so it’s been a fair tradeoff.

This apadravya was performed on a friend after an intense SM session where the client’s friends comforted and reassured him during the piercing; not standard piercing practice in 2017 but at the time it wasn’t that unusual for ‘enhancing’ piercings to be performed in a ritualized sexual context.

This video is presented for archival purposes only and should not be considered a how-to.

 

 

30/50

I received these Polaroids in the mid 1990s from a gentleman I met through Ken Schein’s UNIQUE contact group; at the time I was considering a frenum piercing with the intention of settling on a larger gauge. It would take me almost another decade to finally go ahead with it, an initial 2g frenum performed by piercer Sean Philips, but that paled in comparison to my pen pal’s astonishingly enlarged piercing.

The 7/16″ x 8″ bolt mentioned in the annotation  is being used as an ad hoc urethral sound.

Happy 2017

Unlabeled photo, 1970s.


Happy New Years from Sacred Debris!
Today marks the start of our 4th year as a blog. I hope that you folks enjoy what we’re doing here. The site is still in a state of semi-hiatus but I’ve got a few new posts in the works so check back (or better yet- subscribe!) soon. As always: likes, shares, comments and tips are appreciated.

This photo dates back to the late 1970s and features a very dashing tattooed/pierced gentleman. No artist/model credit was included with the 35mm print.

Banner Men NSFW

According to my end of year (2015) poll, the majority of Sacred Debris readers work in some capacity at piercing or tattoo shops. So I’m not sure that a NOT SAFE FOR WORK tag is entirely necessary (if you work at a piercing shop that has issues with you looking at photos of Jack and Sid, you should probably find a new job) but tellingly enough when I use it I get greater reach on the post. Continue reading

For the man who has everything…

malehide

One of these days I’ll finish up the article I started on the Gay Leather roots of the modern body piercing community; like a lot of things I work on it’s a quarter finished, sitting in a notepad waiting for me dive back into it, but until then…

Every time I flip though old issues Drummer Magazine I come across so much amazing content. This ad from a 1975/6 issue reminds us that there has always been a market for people wanting blinged-out TIT STUDS.

Do you want me to drop my drawers?

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This one features Jack- in a rare PG rated appearance, talking about Pauline Clarke’s newly launched Piercing World Magazine, the current issue of PFIQ and a funny conversation with some South Florida auto-mechanics. ~ Jack Yount, Piercing World & PFIQ

 

In the five years I knew him, almost every conversation I had with Jack Yount ended with him dropping his drawers. It didn’t really matter what he was talking about or even who he was talking to- at some point the pants would come down and he’d take you on a tour of his latest tattoo work or modification project. It never seemed strange or inappropriate; if anything wearing pants seems like a hinderance and inconvenience and when he finally got to take them off he was much more at ease. That’s how I like to remember Jack; big smile and no pants.

When I originally posted this clip back in 2014 I cut it down to a safe for work edit; so consider this the ‘R-rated director’s cut’ of Jack’s show & tell with Sailor Sid. There were no notations on the VHS master, but I’m assuming this was filmed sometime in the late 1980s at Sid’s South Florida Silver Anchor Tattoo Studio.