Tag Archives: Body Modification

SPCSBTT98001: Hiro

spcsbtt98001SPCSBTT98001
Artist: Steve Haworth (implants)
Client: Hiro
Year: 1998 (September)
Location: South Beach, Miami (Eden Roc Hotel)
Photographer: Shawn Porter

I first met Hiro in September of 1998 at the Crowe & Dwyer Tattoo Tour in South Beach Miami. Even surrounded by heavily tattooed people, Hiro stood out; his large forehead implants and stretched nostrils were pretty far out for a tattoo convention in 1998 and every time I tried to introduce myself I’d find him surrounded by photographers.

Steve Haworth finally got us together in his hotel room, and with the help of his interpreter we were able to get to know each other as I documented his modifications. He was in the States collecting work; tattooing from Grime and Guy Aitchison as well as implant and modification work from Steve.

When I ran into him several years later he had added beautiful facial scarifications to his already impressive body of work.

 

Una más cerveza

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I woke up this morning to find my social networking streams full of photos of Shannon Larratt; bearded and serious, monastic and stoic with motivational quotes accompanying them. It’s been two years since he passed away; who he was will, in time, be replaced by who people want him to have been.

Those of us who knew him- who laughed with him, fought with him, spoke to him every day or had spats where we didn’t speak for months- who remember the good, the bad and the ugly of him- have a responsibility to remind the people who are looking for a prophet or a guru that behind it all there was just a dude. A funny, good hearted dude who was as frail and fallible, as strong and as sure as anyone else. Shannon was a man, not a meme.

My memory of Shannon for today is how my friendship with him profoundly affected my wardrobe. I never left a meeting with Shannon Larratt without having at least one t-shirt gifted (or forced upon) to me. Some were funny. Some were bad. Some had his face on them. Some had genitals on them. A lot of them had genitals on them. I’d say “no thanks man, I already have 200 BME shirts” and somehow I’d still end up leaving with a bag stuffed with them.

This photo finds Shannon pleasantly drunk at his house in La Paz, Mexico having one of my Scarwars shirts forced on him. That BMEFest- 2005- was hands down the best BME event I ever attended. It was all smiles, laughter, good times and just one more beer.

It’s been a strange trip, but one I’m certainly glad to have been on with him.

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Body Art issue 4 cover

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I still haven’t heard back from the student who’s research request I helped out on so I figured I’d drop another scan that I did from the information I provided to her.

Body Art magazine was UK based publication that ran 23 issues from 1988-1996.
Unlike PFIQ (which focused almost exclusively on body piercing) or the tattoo magazines of the time, Body Art was more free-form, covering piercing, tattooing, surgical modification, hair/makeup/clothing and more.

 

Gonzo

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I first started seeing Efrain Gonzalez’s portraits of pierced fans/NYC fetish scene in the PFIQ magazines of the 1990s. We met for the first time at the Roseland Ballroom in New York City almost fifteen years ago. Through the years I’ve never seen him not enjoying himself, always ready with a smile and never without his camera. Photographer Atom Moore snapped this portrait of Efrain at the 2007 Philadelphia SCARWARS3 event.

You can see Efrain’s photographic work here: Hellfire Press.

I need this like I need a hole in the head….

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An anonymous tumblr follower suggested that I start adding all of the ‘one shot’ updates- the single photos with no articles to go with them- to the Sacreddebris.com site proper instead of just dropping them on tumblr. It makes sense considering that anything I post here also ends up there, and who knows… it may even make it look like I update this site more often than I do.

I’ve been pretty open about the future of this blog; I can’t say it’s going to make it past 1st January 2015. But until I pull the plug  I might as well try to keep it updated.

This photo is an early digital camera shot (thus the quality) from approximately 1996-7 that was submitted to the SPCOnline site by BME Editor Shannon Larratt. I’ve written about this before- the infamous ‘fork handle dermal elevator’ procedure (which you can check out here– but for those too busy to click the link…

Shannon had a set of implants in his forehead done by a traveling practitioner and he felt they were crooked. Since the artist had moved on he had to have his roommate ‘fix’ the placement, but without proper tools they resorted to using the flat end of a fork’s handle in place of a dermal elevator. There’s a lot of talk recently about irresponsibility with documenting certain procedures, but when Shannon submitted these to SPC we didn’t even consider the possible negative consequences of publishing graphic, ill advised procedural photos.

Remembering Josh Burdette

This article originally ran on BME’s MODBLOG on 09/02/2013.
It has been edited slightly. I still miss Josh.

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“i had a dream a while back. in it, i met myself. the me that i met greeted the dream me in a way that i often greet people, with hands raised together as if in prayer, a sign of coming in peace. in this dream, the other me had scars shaped like arrows on the heels of his hands. one pointing up, one pointing down. i woke from the dream with this image burned into my mind. over time, the symbolism became clear to me…
….as above, so below. the sacred and the profane. heaven and earth. good and evil. black and white. brain and body. what goes up, must come down. there are a million examples and ways to describe the idea, but it all comes back to balance. none of these things would exist without the other. they may occupy opposite ends of a spectrum, but they are inextricably linked to each other. my goal is to maintain that balance in my life. to have one foot in each world. these scars will remind me of that.” – Josh Burdette, Scarwars.net

The first thing most people thought when they met Josh Burdette was usually “that’s one big mother fucker.” OBMF. That’s how I first got to known Josh, back in the glory days of the late 1990s Body Modification scene of rec. arts.bodyart and the IAM.BME community site. Josh was a larger than life presence all around- a fixture in the D.C. Music scene as the Manager and head of security of the 9:30 Club since 1997, he stood as the WALL OF BEARD at countless shows. An imposing figure, Josh could have relied on his size to intimidate people, instead, in 2006 he had this to say about ‘bouncing’ to the Washington Post:

“A bouncer is looking to bounce people. It’s a reactive way of doing things. We’re the face of the club, and we have to do our best to be as friendly, polite and accessible as we can. Some of us look big and scary, but we’re just people, too. We’re just working our jobs.”
I saw him, not too long ago, at the Stay Calm memorial we held here in Philadelphia for Shannon Larratt; we hugged like we always do, gave some colorful commentary on the state of the world and the Body Modification community, and finally getting to the point of why we had all come together that day as a community- remembering our friend- he laughingly told me that we were going to have a moratorium on any of our friends dying till at least 2015, to spread the word to the people we love that they’re to stick around for a while.

I wish Josh would have been able to keep up the pact.

Josh Burdette passed away in Washington DC on Sunday September 1st. He was 36 years old. I’ll miss running into him backstage at LUCERO shows, chatting about our lives instead of watching the opening acts. I’ll miss bitching about ‘these kids today’ with him, reading his latest ‘Wall of Beard’ comic strip adventure and getting one of his epic bear hugs. I’ll miss Josh.

 

ModCocks

modcocks

This post originally ran as a diary entry on my personal blog on 03.28.2013 and has been slightly edited for content.

ModCocks.
This is a true story. I haven’t thought about it in years, but a conversation earlier with my friend Christy brought it back, and I figured since I’m still in a ‘those were the days!’ kind of mood I’d get this one down for posterity even though it’s a quickie.

For me, Body Modification has always had a root in sexuality. I don’t really talk about sexuality that much here on SD, which is odd given how important it is to my life. I think that there’s still that feeling that I have to limit or censure what I say here because it’s so ‘public’ but for today we’ll just pretend that we’re all adults and that a dirty anecdote is perfectly acceptable.

It was either at ModCon2 or ModCon3 in Toronto Ontario (which would have been 2000 or 2002) when Shannon an I first started joking about the idea of ModCocks. The plan was to get a handful of DIY penis molding kits, send them out to our practitioner friends and have them send the molds back for us to go into production on dildos based on our penises. Subincised dildos, dildos with implants- very niche items for the modification community.

In the middle of trying to orchestrate a full scale underground surgical modification event, we found ourselves laughing hysterically on the phone to friends who couldn’t make it up for the convention, asking if they’d consent to being turned into a sex object. You’d be surprised at how many people readily agreed to do it; then again, probably not.

Like a lot of our hairbrained schemes, we had a full marketing plan laid out- which included sending a few samples to more active contributors of BME/HARD for field testing and documentation- but sadly it never went anywhere.

Remembering Keith Alexander

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As I get older, nostalgia has become much more important to me. I didn’t get it as a kid; holidays with my parents and Uncles invariably led to annual recollections of since passed family and friends. By the time I was a teenager I could have told some of the stories verbatim; a collection of anecdotes about people who had passed away before I was born but who held a place in my Mother’s heart that was so special that stories were retold again and again for fear of losing them forever.

Eight 1 years ago today Keith Alexander passed away. Out for a bicycle ride on the Shore Road Path in Brooklyn a child cyclist riding ahead of him swerved, causing Keith to swerve quickly to compensate, his front tire hitting a pothole in the path causing him to ride full-speed into the guard rail.. The accident cost him his life. In the years that have passed I’ve found myself telling stories about him; sometimes to mutual friends who’ve heard them a million times, sometimes to people who never had the pleasure of meeting him but who listen intently as I share the “this one time” stories of one of the most dynamic human beings I’ve ever known.

When Keith was around I was always aware that I had to try harder. Not to impress him really; he never made any bones about being proud of me when it was warranted, offering me advice when I asked and kicking me in the butt when I needed it. I’m infamously critical of modern body piercers because piercers like Keith spoiled me. So many practitioners in our community consider themselves Shamans but offer nothing more than the promise of a straight piercing or a sterile suspension. They talk about Rites of Passage, but they’re not self aware enough to realize that it’s not the modification that’s the Rite- it’s the paths we walk. Keith saw the bigger picture, realizing the incredibly personal role a modification practitioner can have in the lives of his clients.

When I posted a teaser of this article on my Facebook page the other day, a friend responded that she didn’t know who Keith was. So. Let me tell you about my friend Keith.
Continue reading

Notes:

  1. July 11th 2014 marks nine years since Keith’s passing.

Happy Birthday, Jim Ward!

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It’s such a rare thing in the Body Modification world to be able to legitimately claim to have been the inventor of anything; we take for granted that some things have no definable origins and that if someone says they were the first at anything, there is probably someone somewhere who did it years before them.

Except for Jim Ward.

While Jim didn’t invent body piercing, it’s impossible not to think of him as the architect of body piercing as an industry. Before Jim and his Gauntlet there was no such thing as Professional Body Piercing. It was an underground thing with some practitioners knowing more than others, working discretely out of people’s houses, T&P parties, hotel rooms and the back rooms of Leather shops.

Jim changed everything when he opened the Gauntlet’s first retail location in West Hollywood in November of 1978. He invented the concept of the Body Piercer as a profession. Through trial and error he and his staff which would go on to include such luminaries as Elayne Angel, Paul King, Keith Alexander (Gauntlet NYC) and Jon Cobb (Gauntlet NYC) contributed techniques and standards that would revolutionize the culture of body piercing. His PFIQ would be the blueprint for those of us who document our community (my use of Who’s Who is a direct homage to my favorite section in PFI) and his book RUNNING THE GAUNTLET has become an indispensable tome for people interested in the roots of our culture.

Jim is also a damn nice guy who is very kind and patient to the scores of people who’s influenced, always taking the time to help out when he can by answering our many questions and offering presentations at the APP conference in Las Vegas.

So happy birthday Jim, and thank you for all you’ve done for us.

Hi, I’m New Here.

jewelry from Anatometal

jewelry from Anatometal

I’m interested in a lot of things, some of which are: permanence, metamorphosis, control, carnival history, jewelry and value.  Today, right now, right this minute, and for the rest of forever, I’m specifically interested in otherness and adornment.  For me, these things converge and make up a large portion of my identity.  I wouldn’t be surprised if this were something that was felt by most people:  feelings of alienation, due to a certain sense of self, are commonalities that many people have with one another.  But we don’t talk about it, well, not unless we know the other person feels that way.  For me, the drive to become heavily modified is an integral part to who I am as a person.  I knew this before I was old enough to understand what any of it meant.  I knew it when I was in elementary school.  I remember the precise moment that I knew, too. The person who showed me what it was, had no idea what he did. He probably didn’t even know I existed. If I saw that same punk rocker today, I know I could point him out.  He had a HUGE septum piercing.. or, what’s what it looked like at the time. I knew that was what I wanted.  Without saying a word, he told me that what I knew I needed to do was okay.  On that day, everything changed.  I knew where I was headed and I knew that there were other people out there who would understand me… I also knew that because I lived around a bunch of rich white people in the middle of suburbia, that it’d be a really long time until I was able to really find any of them.

I got into body modification a little late in the game as far as the contemporary American body modification timeline is concerned.  Hell, when The Gauntlet  started in the mid 70s, I wasn’t even born yet.  I might be taking a big leap here, but I’d identify myself as a part of the last group of people who got into this before it got trendy.  Maybe some of you who came long before my time would disagree, but, I’ll say this:  I’m fucking dedicated to this lifestyle.  My life and livelihood, much of my education and my career as a maker is rooted in this culture and this identity.  It’s not a choice, well, not for me.  Sure, it’s a choice to step into a tattoo shop.  I get that.  But the internal drive is not a choice.

A few years back I remember reading a blog post by Shannon Larratt, the creator of BMEzine.  He compared the desire to become heavily modified with being gay.  Later, I interviewed Shannon as part of my research for my MFA thesis work and he kind of turned on the statement.  He stated, “I still think there’s a place for this idea, but because of how much society has changed — I don’t think anyone ever expected things to grow this large or this mainstream – it would be a little different in nature. In some ways we are a victim of our success. The sort of people who’d want to be a part of such a commune in the past needed protection from the mainstream unmodded society — now they also need protection from the mainstream modded society! We have very much fallen prey to gentrification.”  On one hand, I agree with his statement because we have become so big.  But on the other, I know that what he said in the past is true, because I still feel it.

I question the sincerity of the masses who have joined this community (if it can be called a “community” anymore) and I wonder what happened to earning your place within it.  That’s an argument that I remember seeing often in many of the IAM/BME forums:  What is the difference between those who have manipulated their body to the point of it seriously effecting their ability to navigate through mainstream society and those who choose to only have an earlobe piercing?  They have both chosen a form of modification, so, what makes them different?  I certainly am not stating that one form of permanent or semi permanent adornment/modification is better than the other – it’s an individual choice.  However, I would argue that they are different and that the more extreme of those examples is driven by an internal force that is not felt by the masses.  I’m not sure what the line is or how to articulate precisely where it’s drawn.  What I can say for sure is that I know the line when I see it.

So, why does this question matter?  I think it matters because it all boils down to identity within our greater culture.  Adornment is a part of our individual identities – if we don’t express it in a form of modification, then it’s expressed in another way: the clothes we wear, any jewelry that we leave on and often forget about (like a wedding ring or small cross necklace), the cut and color that we choose for our hair, etc,.  This aspect of each of our lives in inescapable and because of that, we should be considering it on the daily.

So, I wanted to share the private e-mail interview that Shannon was kind enough to grant me as a part of my first post here at Sacred Debris – even when he was feeling shitty, Shannon responded to me. He hoped to contribute to the academic sphere with regard to body modification.  This was the last time I ever communicated with him.  Despite knowing each other for years, we were never the best of friends, but, it is because of him that I’m married to my husband, that I have many of the friends that I do, and so many memories of an amazing community that has since dispersed.  The community he built with us helped me to gain the confidence to do what I knew was right for me and it allowed me to find my footing.  He got one thing right for sure, we have certainly grown.

Shannon [email protected]

9/7/12

to me
 R:  How old are you?  Where were you born?
S:  I was born September 29, 1973 in Victoria, British Columbia.
R:  Where can people find you online or in other print publications?
S:  (I think that’s obvious)
R:  What made you first get into body modification?
S:  A combination of nature and nurture, I assume. Because I started expressing a body modification drive at a young age, in a rural environment, far away from any outside influences and before a body modification industry even existed, I can only assume that I’m wired for it on some level. I’m sure it helped that my mother grew up in South Africa and we had various books on African body art in our home library, and that my father had a tattoo that he’d won in the sixties in a wrestling competition.
R:  What do you think your position is in the body modification community?

S:  I’d always thought of myself as a sort of historian or amateur anthropologist or even just journalist, but then someone told me that my role is “catalyst”. That is, to bring about change in others. To start fires in people. I liked that a lot and thought it was quite apt, because I haven’t just documented the world of body modification and body play — I’ve also promoted it and done everything I could to help it grow, and to guide it in that growth.

R:  Why did you start BME and IAM?  When you started them, what were they?  Since you are no longer directly affiliated (please correct me if I’m incorrect here), from your perspective, are they still functioning in the same way today?

S:  I started BME because I wanted to share what I was doing, to find other people like me, and I wanted to change the world so that the things that made me an outsider became normal. I wanted to create an space where people could safely express themselves in a positive and uplifting manner. In the decade and a half that I ran BME, it never veered from that. IAM was BME’s community arm, originally started so that I and others would have a place to blog.

To be honest, the biggest changes in BME are due to culture as a whole changing.

R:  What do you think about the body modification community now?  Is it a community?  Why or why not?

S:  Yes, body modification is still a community, but in a different way than it was ten years ago, because it’s much, much larger and sits in a different — and broader — demographic space.

R:  Quite a while ago, I remember you writing about starting a modification commune where modified people could live together, almost like a tribe.  What was the fuel for this idea?  Is it still something you want to pursue?  What would be the benefits?

S:  I still think there’s a place for this idea, but because of how much society has changed — I don’t think anyone ever expected things to grow this large or this mainstream — it would be a little different in nature. In some ways we are a victim of our success. The sort of people who’d want to be a part of such a commune in the past needed protection from the mainstream unmodded society — now they also need protection from the mainstream modded society! We have very much fallen prey to gentrification.

R:  How do you think being a heavily modified individual is viewed by people who do not participate in body modification?

S:  That’s very difficult for me to answer. I have very little affinity for the “normal” person.

R:  Do you think making permanent changes to your body is significant?  Why or why not?

S:  Altering your physical form makes the statement that you control your destiny and your physical being. Redefining what you are is an essential part of the transcendent human experience.

R:  How do you think commitment plays into body modification?

S:  I think that’s different for everyone. The popularity of tattoo removal and the reversal of stretched ears and so on shows that a great many people getting involved with body modification did it with minimal foresight or understanding of the level of commitment they were signing up for.

R:  Do you believe alienation plays a role in body modification?  Either as an instigator, a result or both?

S:  Probably. But I think that focusing on things like this can distract from the larger meaning and worse, create a stereotype.

R:  Do you think people who modify themselves are looking to be seen as a spectacle?

S:  I’m sure some people are. Others aren’t. I think that reflects on the person’s individual personality rather than anything universal to body modification. And again, I think that focusing on things like this risks creating a stereotype.

R:  Quite a while ago, I remember you writing something along the lines of modification being compared to being gay or straight.  If my recollection is somewhat accurate, can you talk about this comparison?

S:  I don’t know if this is as true as it was in the past, because these days a broader set of people are drawn to body modification because of how popular it is as a fashion, but I believe that the body modification drive is as hardwired as sexuality is. There has been some research showing that there is a “cutter” gene — people who express their emotions through body play that is — and I suspect that’s the tip of the genetic iceberg on this question.

R:  You share a lot of images and stories related to body modification online.  Why do you do this?

S:  I think this is answered in your question about why I created BME.

END OF INTERVIEW

With regard to any future posts that I make here at Sacred Debris, y’all can probably expect a more academic (not to be confused with dry) approach to the posts about many of the things that I stated earlier that interest me.  I hope they interest you, too.  I don’t know how often I’ll post, but I’ll try my best to put something up as often as I can.  I really love what Shawn is doing here – I think it’s important, and I’m excited to be a part of it.

 

 


1964426_779778552052022_74016072_nRachel Timmins earned her MFA in Studio Art (Metals Concentration) in December 2012 and her BFA in Metal/Jewelry Design with a Minor in Sculpture from Buffalo State College in 2009. Her work has been shown in numerous exhibitions both nationally and internationally in venues like the National Gallery of Victoria, Snyderman-Works Gallery, the Virginia Museum of Contemporary Art, the Design Museum London and the Baltimore Museum of Art. Rachel’s work can be seen in many publications such as Unexpected Pleasures published by Rizzoli Publications, Contemporary Jewelry in Perspective published by Lark Books and Jewel Book: International Annual of Contemporary Jewel Art published by Stitchting Kunst Boek. She can be found lecturing on her work and other related topics as well as giving workshops across the United States at various institutions and universities. Rachel lives in Baltimore, MD, where she often teaches at the Maryland Institute college of art. She resides with her pug, three cats and husband, Matt. To see Rachel’s work, please visit: www.racheltimmins.com