Tag Archives: 1990s

Picture in Picture

When I first approached Jack Yount about the possibility of doing my meatotomy, he gave me a photocopy of a chart of basic line drawings of possible male genital modifications with exotic names like the Full Persian Butterfly and Cobra to educate me on some of the options available. To this day I have no idea where or when the drawings originated, just that Jack had a folder of them ready for anyone interested in his modification work.

The gentleman in these photos may have seen Jack’s chart, detailing the process of forming his own Cobra.

These date back to the late 80s/early 90s.

Shannon Larratt Detroit 1998

My first in person meeting with BME founder Shannon Larratt came three years after we connected via email over a post I made in the rec.arts.bodyart Usenet group announcing a memorial event we were holding to celebrate the life of my friend and mentor Jack Yount. Shannon was in Detroit to purchase a Kit Car 1 and I was there to meet him. Having chatted into the wee hours of the morning almost daily for the previous few years and getting to know him as well as could be expected from our digital communication, I found him to be as socially awkward in person as anticipated, but also very inquisitive and dryly funny.

We took a few rolls of film of each other’s modifications, had a mediocre hotel dinner (Shannon was afraid to leave the hotel) and like our online chats, ended up staying up all night riffing on anything that came into our heads; body modification, cinema, and instances of same sex masturbation amongst hockey players as an act of male bonding.

These photos (and the video below) were taken in 1998.


Video of the non-modification portions of our 1998 chat has been archived, but since it’s just 3am ramblings between a few friends hasn’t been shared publicly.

Filling in the blanks

It’s been 27 years since I got my first tattoo and while my interest in various disciplines of body modification has changed in focus over the years I find that my desire to be fully tattooed is still as much a goal as it was when I sat down at a biker shop in Georgia and had that first poorly applied one done on my inner forearm.

When Shannon Larratt and I were planning the guest list for the first ModCon event in 1998 (which never happened: Evolution of a Subculture- ModCon 1) we required potential guests to list their modifications and found that tattooing was the most common amongst all of the groups represented. Extreme piercing fans, voluntary amputees, heavy genital modifications- regardless of which modification brought them to us, almost everyone had at least one tattoo.

Here’s modification legend Jack Yount filling in some work on his back, early 1990s. Jack had an impressive roster of body modification procedures but his tattoos, which ranged from the whimsical to the erotic, were probably the most time consuming.

A wish is a dream your heart makes

As my wife and I busily prepare our luggage for this weekend’s trip to the Walt Disney World Resort in (rainy) Orlando, Florida I thought it was only fitting that I put together some very NSFW photos of Jack Yount’s Disney tattoos for archival here at Sacred Debris.

Jack’s quaint little house in Zephyrhills was filled with paintings and statues- mostly homoerotic subject matter but with a noticeable presence of Disneyana; he was a great fan of Mickey Mouse and the Disney animated films and in the early 1990s began a full leg tattoo of iconic Disney moments by Ancient Art’s Just Plain Bud Pierson. The tattoos were a whimsical contrast to Jack’s other more shocking body modifications; the placement of Timothy Mouse 1 shrieking in horror at the sight of his subincised penis was intentionally tongue in cheek.

Jack was very encouraging when I decided on a Disney-themed tattoo for my own back-piece (pictured above at Scarwars2 in LA) by Inksmith & Roger’s Mike Wilson.

The photos include Disney tattoos by Bud, Jack’s pieced, split and silicone enhanced penis and R.S.- the owner of the infamous removed split penis that ended up in a jelly jar.

Halfadravya- Tom Brazda NSFW

JMsubpierce01GMsubpierceI’ve been interested in body art for a long time. I now have a large subincision, head split halfway back, and three pairs of 8 gauge jewelry up both sides of the subincision. If I’m interested in impressing a partner, I put six captive bead rings in the holes, and they’re 3/4″ inside diameter and hard to ignore. If I’m going to the gym to work out I just put in six 8 ga. barbells so when I’m in the shower it isn’t as obvious that I’m carrying around a significant amount of metal. I’ve worked out regularly for the past few years, and nobody has ever commented on or questioned my genital piercings, though occasionally somebody will say something about my unusual tattoos – J. 1

There aren’t many subcultures where you can talk about a penis in terms of being famous or influential. Adult movies, certainly, have had their share of iconic appendages so much so that names of particularly endowed stars from the 1970s and 80s are still currency when talking about larger than average measurements. Our own body modification community, in it’s recent history, has also had it’s own rogues gallery of iconic altered penises like Carl Carrol who appeared originally in PFIQ #15 and GM who was known to BME readers as “J” who’s “story of a subincision” article and videos 2 are frequently cited by clients requesting the procedure as a major inspiration.

Other subincisions had appeared on BME and SPC before J, but his had a certain aesthetic appeal that became the archetype for a split penis. While doing his early self done modification work he was unaware of the larger community that shared his passions, keeping it a secret from all but his most intimate contacts. We met through the UNIQUE mailing list 3 and eventually met in person in 1999 at the first ModCon event in Toronto. When he discovered body piercing it was a novelty to him- I remember an excited letter where he marveled that “they can PIERCE that now??” in reference to a basic genital piercing. The dichotomy always struck me funny- that a man who had disunited his urethra to the scrotum and who used mercury filled balloons as sounding rods had no idea about the piercing scene that ran parallel to heavier modifications.

J travelled to Toronto to meet BME founder Shannon Larratt and stopped by Stainless Studios where he had Tom Brazda do a series of piercings on his split shaft and glans; we affectionately called his reverse Prince Albert a halfadravya because it was the 1990s and making up names for piercings was all the rage. It’s my sincere hope that it in no way influenced the dolphin kisses and panda bites of today.

 

Notes:

  1.  J: A Personal View: BMEZINE.Com Interview by Brian Henderson
  2. http://sacreddebris.com/subincisionfun
  3. Published by BALL CLUB QUARTERLY’S Ken Schein, Unique was a contact zine that offered mail forwarding for modification devotees.

The Middle School Era: Scarification by Keith Alexander

keithandclient keithclient

Sent to me sometime in the late 1990s for safe keeping, these photos feature scarification (cutting and possibly branding) from Keith Alexander. Keith was the only artist officially invited to the first ScarWars event in 2005 (the rest filled out a registration form that was open to all) to which he politely declined. I think that made me respect him even more.

 

The Middle School Era: The Art of Cutting and Scarification with Keith Alexander

KAlearning

If you enjoyed May’s branding performance, you won’t want to miss this one! In an encore presentation, Keith Alexander, on of NY’s premier piercing, cutting and branding enthusiasts returns to the Learning X-Change to present a lecture and live demonstration on one of today’s most popular forms of body art… Cutting/Scarification. In a riveting presentation, Keith discusses the art’s origins, rapid rise in popularity, social ramifications and present day applications, and demonstrates proper preparation and sterilization, tools of the trade, creating an applying the design, cutting techniques, aftercare, how to achieve optimum scarring special effects, etc.

If you’re a reader of Occult Vibrations you may have seen a recent update with a few early 1990s tattoo shop fliers with art by bio-mech legend Guy Aitchison; discovering them happy accidents since I was looking for a piece of correspondence for a future SD update and found a stack of unsorted mail that hasn’t been out of storage in at least a decade. I still haven’t found the piece of mail (a letter from Bud Viking Navaro to Jack Yount) that I was looking for, but this stack yielded the Aitchison fliers, a letter from “J” (from J: Story of a subincision) and a few from Keith Alexander.

KA2

I had forgotten about his Learning X-Change Scarification class; the flier included didn’t include full information (day and month, no year given) and the envelope’s postmark is unreadable so I can’t say for sure when this class- $10 per person to learn the basics of scarification- was offered. It was likely 1996 (judging from the MAPS Corporate Seal on the enclosed letterhead) or shortly after when scarification was just beginning to receive any outside of the community media attention.

It might shock modern audiences to see technique classes offered to the general public, especially at so low a price, but the crossover with cutting in a S/M context “democratized” the modification, with a large segment of the clients looking for scars and brands in the 1970s-1990s a part of the fetish lifestyle and the amount of professional scarification artists worldwide offering safe, sterile cutting a small minority.

 

I’ve got scars that can’t be seen

shannonlarratt sacred debrisIt’s been eighteen years, give or take a month or two, since this photograph of Shannon Larratt was taken. I’ve posted about that day before, 1 citing it as the meeting where we came up with the concept that would grow into the ModCon events 2 and how it impacted the future of the BME and SPC sites. It was also a night where we stayed up talking until after sun-rise, sharing stories buzzed on caffeine and candy and not taking ourselves too seriously.

 

Shannon was wearing a classic BME.FreeQ.com shirt that day; you can see a little bit of the logo in the photograph.