Tag Archives: 1980s

Color Grading. (NSFW)

By the time I finally click upload on the video that’s currently in my editing queue- a video that will clock in with a runtime of somewhere around the eighteen minute range- I’ll have spent roughly ten hours on task time for the final edit. Most of that will be spent color grading the footage, which was shot on VHS tape at Sailor Sid Diller’s Florida home/studio in 1985. Continue reading

Silver Anchor Video VHS

Not a super exciting photo, but the contents of this 1980s era VHS tape that was filmed in the home/tattoo studio of Sailor Sid Diller, have recently been archived and soon, excerpts will be showing up here on SD.

Sid was a tireless documentarian; photos, videos (both film and tape) and letters were exchanged with the small but passionate pre-boom piercing community from his Florida home. This video featured Sid, Bob Houle and a few unnamed piercing fans. And a lot of body shaving.

BSTA: David Vidra


Ari: I always like to kick these off with an introduction, so tell us a little about you, Mama. 

Vidra: My introduction to the industry was 1978. I met a gentleman by the name of Linus Herrell and he owned a store in Cleveland called Body Language and that store, how do you explain it? It’s like one of the first alternative bookstores.  We didn’t sell any porn, nothing like that, but it had a rubber room and a leather room, where there were all different types of books and little novelties and stuff like that. Also, he had a piercing room. He had magazines like PFIQ, the whole nine yards and I was like, “OK, this is fascinating.” I met him when he was a bartender at one of the little leather bars in Cleveland, in fact the oldest one in Ohio. He had a huge bull’s tether in his septum, and I was just staring at him, because number one it was very attractive and number two I was like, “hmm, how did you do that? How did he get something that thick into his septum?”  I asked him a couple of questions. He explained it to me, explained the process of stretching and piercing.  When I asked him where do you get something like that done he said he’d gotten work done at the Gauntlet in L.A. by a gentlemen called Jim Ward. That was my first introduction to Gauntlet, and even that was through Linus.  He told me about PFIQ and the new shop he’d be opening, etc etc, and then in his psychotic manner he said, “So what are you doing tonight? I get off in two hours.” I said, “eh, probably just going home” and he said, “Well let’s go home and fuck”, and I’m like, “okay.” Now realize back then I was working for a Catholic Church.  I was the rectory cook, as well as directing theatre for the deaf and blind and just about any other handicap you can imagine and normal people all on the same stage.  It was a lot of work, it was a lot of fun, and I loved doing it.  That’s what I did for a living back then. Cooking for a church rectory for the priests and the nuns who ran the Hunger Center in a pretty impoverished area of Cleveland, but it was also the deaf and the blind center for the Diocese of Cleveland. I had worked with almost all types of disabilities really from the time I was 13. Continue reading

BSTA: Scott Shatsky


Scott Shatsky may not be the most recognizable names in piercing, but his roots run deep – from being a young man hanging around the original Gauntlet, to apprenticing under Jim Ward and being part of the original Gauntlet San Fransisco crew, Scott offers some wonderful insight into that early pivotal time. Scott remains part of that quiet faction who was more enamored with piercing as an intimate movement, and gives us some new perspective on those Gauntlet years as a client, manager, and Master Piercer.


Ari – Where does piercing start for you, Scott?

Scott – I grew up in Los Angeles, and I always had a fascination with anything other than just being white, so tattoos and piercings fell into that. I was just always very interested, so in high school and even before I was a punk rock kid I was always sticking needles in me for piercings. I don’t even remember how I found Gauntlet, but it was in West Hollywood. I walked in and I became friends with Jim (Ward) and became pretty good friends with Cross, who I share a birthday with. I was a young kid. I wasn’t even in a place where I could get pierced there, age-wise. Cross was only a couple of years older than I was at the time. I have this picture of me sitting there with Jim and his beautiful silver and purple peacock wallpaper in the piercing studio when he was piercing my cartilage. So my identity in that world started years before I was piercing. Continue reading

Sailor Sid Dachshund

I’ve been procrastinating importing some new Sandbox video content for the last week; my wife and I recently added a new four footed member to our family and as much fun as importing and cleaning up video might be it pales in comparison to watching our new kitten smacking around a crumpled up Target receipt for twenty consecutive minutes or trying to encourage our twelve year old Italian Greyhound (Mr. Bailey Papers) to accept a tiny ball of furless energy into the family.

I’m sure Sailor Sid was equally in love with his dachshunds and would totally understand that our pets come first.

Reading Glasses

When I’m scanning vintage prints or flipping through digital files on a backup drive, I’m almost always drawn to candid photos over more graphic or procedural ones. Earlier tonight I transferred a 40gb video of Jack having silicone injections over to digital storage and while I’m sure it would be much more of interest to a lot of our readers, I kept going back to this photo of Jack, legs kicked up reading for tonight’s update. It’s been 21 years since I’ve seen him and while our modification experiences certainly helped define what I’m trying to accomplish with Sacred Debris I can honestly say that just spending time with Jack relaxing in his living room talking about nothing special is what I miss the most.

1980s, possible DC or Maryland.

Winky Spot

The process of getting a guiche piercing was, without a doubt, the funniest thing I’ve ever done on all fours involving a surgical marker and a sharp implement. Those who’ve been around the piercing scene long enough to remember the knee/chest method of performing a guiche will likely also remember the ‘winky spot’ portion of the procedure.  Jack Yount performed this guiche piercing in 1986 at a Knoxville, TN tattoo convention. I’ve been trying to find out more info on who did the client’s tattoos but so far no luck.