Category Archives: Video

Safe Guide to Professional Piercing: Outtakes 2

 

I spent some time this week cleaning up my ‘unused clips’ folder and decided to breathe a little life into some outtakes from the Safe Guide to Professional Piercing series. This footage was cut from the Prince Albert segment; the client had been marked for nipple piercing but decided last minute not to have it done at the same time of his PA with a post-script scene of him being shaved….

Famed UK Body Artist Alan ‘Mr. Sebastian’ Oversby infamously owned a pillow stuffed with pubic hair and Jack and Sailor Sid were often seen in their videos collecting contributions for it.

 

 

 

SPCBud20018mm001: Bud Larsen Oral History

In March of 2001 I visited erotic artist Bud Larsen in Phoenix Arizona to talk about his work with PFIQ and Drummer magazine; his art helped define the early aesthetic of both periodicals- crisp black lines like a pornographic Al Hirschfeld featuring ultra masculine pinups, dangerous femme fatals and mindbending scifi and fantasy creatures with exaggeratedly large genitals which were more often than not pierced or otherwise decorated.

The entire affair was a disaster of exposed film, lost video/audio tapes and only memories and a few signed PFIQs as a souvenir of the trip. For fourteen years I’ve thought the tapes lost. SD recently received funding to restore 8mm video cassettes and during the sorting/cataloguing I discovered that a video backup of the interview wasn’t lost, just misfiled. This backup was intended to be a safety-net in case something happened to the mini-cassette recorder that we used for the interview was lost, which prophetically did happen, and was never intended to be a “on camera” interview. The handycam was set up to catch the audio and is just haphazardly pointed at Bud and I, and without a lapel mic the audio at times is difficult to hear, but given how woefully under-documented Bud’s career is, it was an amazing find.

This short clip features Bud and I discussing his process for creating a drawing. The audio is muddy, and I still need to scan the PFIQ issue the images we’re discussing come from- there’s a lot more work to do on this tape (hopefully a transcript and better audio) but for now- enjoy a chat with Bud (and my epic bad haircut) and make sure to say thanks to the patrons who sponsored the import/archival of the 8mm collection of the SPC.

(Val Martin wearing Drummer Shirt via The Leather Archives and Museum. Video title art c. Bud Larsen from PFIQ #13)

Uvatiarru trailer: Jon Cobb

Most of us perceive time as something linear that we move or progress through from start to finish. The Inuit believe that time moves through us in a repeating and cyclical fashion; from this they have the word Uvatiarru, meaning both “in the past” and “in the future” at the same time. There are truths that are revealed in the passage of time, and when they are forgotten, the are discovered again on the next cycle. – Shannon Larratt

I just finished doing a data-dump to my backup drive of September’s raw video files; in total I managed to import and archive about 60gb of unedited video content last month with subjects ranging from oral histories to surgical procedural footage. The majority of the import was for archival only, with no immediate plans for the video to appear here on the SD blog.

It’s an often intimidating amount of data, with each imported analog media cassette’s video being split into multiple segments. As the files moved from laptop(s) to the backup drive I started thinking about BMEZINE founder Shannon Larratt’s ultimately unrealized Uvatiarru film project. DV cameras were sent to BME fans all over the world, their content returned to Shannon for inclusion into the finished film.

Like the hundreds of clips transferring to my digital archive, Shannon’s video contributions kept coming in; the Cured (which was the original name of the documentary) US tour, the British Virgin Islands tapes, piercer Jon Cobb’s trip to Myanmar, Vietnam, and Cambodia… all of those segments just waiting to be stitched together and reformed into something greater than the sum of it’s parts…

A website popped up, as with most of Shannon’s projects, with a mission statement and a few stills and trailers. Ultimately the film was never to be completed.

At least three trailers were cut for the film, including this ‘behind the scenes’ trailer featuring Jon Cobb.

Most of us perceive time as something linear that we move or progress through from start to finish. The Inuit believe that time moves through us in a repeating and cyclical fashion; from this they have the word Uvatiarru, meaning both “in the past” and “in the future” at the same time. There are truths that are revealed in the passage of time, and when they are forgotten, the are discovered again on the next cycle.

Rites of the body are humanity’s earliest known form of communication with each other and with the spirit world — as far back as 30,000 years we see everything from simple tattooing to rituals involving amputation of digits by shaman. Over the past 500 years we humans have done our best to mask and even expunge these carnal voices, but they can not be silenced because they are who we are. Our bodies are vessels for these acts; we are designed, by hand of god or by hand of fate, to use our bodies to be the voice of the universe.

All over this world people are responding to a growing feeling inside them, each in their own way and with their own dance, but driven by the same underlying unifying heartbeat. Some dance with a heritage and guidance, but most don’t know the names for the passions that drive them. A wind gathers in them and around them and we’re watching it sweep through the world as we finally realize that the ultimate purpose of billions of unique puzzle pieces in different shapes and colors is to, through the strength of their differences, complete the puzzle that tells us who we are and what we are here to do.

The movie Uvatiarru attempts to take a picture of this storm.
Shot on location in over a dozen countries with hundreds performance artists, social deviants, and modern shaman, Uvatiarru is the result of nearly ten years of preparation and filming by Shannon Larratt and BMEzine.com. The film features amazing performances including all manner of body modification, suspension, piercings, body part removals and reshapings, fireplay, astral travel, and adventure.

Uvatiarru is currently scheduled for theatrical release in July 2004 with a double-DVD edition being released later with hours of bonus footage and several behind the scenes features. Bookmark this website to stay up to date on all the details.

 

 

Source: www.zentastic.com, Uvatiarru content ©2004-2015 bmezine.com

A Safe Guide: Hafadas

Hafada piercing

I’m not really getting much feedback positive or negative on the ‘Safe Guide to Professional Piercing’ series, so I think this will be the last one that goes up for a while. This installment features Sailor Sid Diller piercing Jack Yount’s scrotum in the traditional ‘hafada’ placement. Unlike previous Safe Guide videos, Hafadas finds Sid wearing gloves during the piercing. The videos provide no off-camera context as to why they wore gloves for some procedures and not others, but I’m sure they had their reasons. It’s hard to say.

A Safe Guide: The Navel

Before the 1993 release of the Aerosmith video for their song ‘Cryin’ 1 the navel piercing wasn’t one of the more commonly requested piercings due in part to the “if it protrudes, pierce it” credo that most piercers followed at the time. The first time I remember Jack Yount talking about navel piercings he called them “risky” because of the chances of migration or rejection and while he could be talked into performing the piercing would do his best to steer the client towards something a little more practical.

This excerpt from the 1984 tape ‘A Safe Guide to Practical Piercing’ features Jack doing a navel piercing on Sailor Sid Diller at Sid’s Silver Anchor Tattoo Studio.

Like our other archival videos, this clip features piercing and sterility techniques that are no longer considered safe practice and is presented solely for preservation and discussion. It should not be considered a how-to.

Notes:

  1. Cryin was released in October of 1993 as a single from their April 1993 LP Get a Grip. The video, directed by Marty Callner, starred Alicia Silverstone, Stephen Dorf and Josh Holloway, went on to be a massive hit for the band, spending twelve consecutive weeks at #1 on the Billboard Charts and earning the Video of the Year award at the 1994 MTV Video Music Awards. In the video Silverstone’s character has her navel pierced by an influential West Coast body piercer- the influence of the video created an instant trend worldwide.

A Safe Guide: Prince Albert

Thirty-one years ago, before the piercing scene evolved into the piercing industry the term piercer had a much looser definition than it does today. Over time it's come to represent someone who's served a formal apprenticeship and has spent years honing their craft; who's taken advanced learning opportunities like Intensives and technique classes at the annual APP Conference and Expo, someone who can discuss sterility at a level that would humble a physician, and who can absorb knowledge from their peers as freely and easily as they share it with the generation of piercers who’ve come after them. 

When this video was filmed, being a piercer meant you poked people with needles so they'd have shiny nipples and genitals, and tried to do it as safely as possible.

Finding a professional piercer back then was easy, since there were only a small handful in the world. But unless you lived in California (where the Gauntlet was located) or were part of a group like the Leather/SM culture, having easy access to a true professional piercer simply wasn't an option. So sometimes you had to make do.

Today's piercers would be horrified to find photo illustrated step by step instructions for an ampallang or clitoris piercing- but 30 years ago they were made readily available in PFIQ- who's PIERCE WITH A PRO feature covered almost every basic (and some advanced) piercing imaginable and went on to spawn several instructional videos.

 Some knowledge was deemed to be better than none. So was the case with 'A Safe Guide to Professional Piercing' featuring piercing by Jack Yount (then going by Mr. J) and filmed by Sailor Sid Diller. Out of context this video looks like anything but professional piercing- highly sexualized, a lack of sterility and technique that will make you cringe- but one has to consider the time (gloves weren't commonly worn in 1984)  it was filmed and the community that both Jack and Sid were part of (the highly sexual gay leather scene) to fully contextualize the footage.

The tape was distributed to piercers on Sid's correspondence list who were primarily working in leather shops or home studios.

As with all of our archival content, this video contains outdated piercing and aseptic technique and should not be considered a how-to.

 

Eye on Tampa Bay

In the early 1990s, Master Piercer Jack Yount appeared on a local Tampa talkshow called ‘Eye on Tampa Bay’ with host Kathy Fountain. He was joined by piercers Mike Natali of Bravo! and Silver Anchor and Vincent Weiner and Tasha Berg who hosted the Pinns and Needles events with a small group of piercing fans (myself included) in the audience to help balance out the retirees and elementary school students.

It’s hard to imagine a time when this was considered shocking to daytime TV watchers- but despite us all feeling like animals at the zoo, Jack handled it with his usual wit and charm.

Beta was better

tumblr_nlfvfnNhFZ1town8so1_1280I had a fairly productive time organizing VHS tapes today; trying to get the unlabeled tapes queued up to see what’s on them, categorizing them into groups of piercing, tattooing, modification, etc-the sorting is boring work but the upside is that almost everything I’ve dug out so far has been really rad, save for the tape with the random episodes of (25 year old) Geraldo and Kids in the Hall on it. Which turned out to be pretty rad in retrospect.

I should have some new modification content in the SANDBOX over the next few days for site supporters with the main site hopefully getting some early 1980s piercing content early next week.

Thanks so much for the continued interest and support of the SD project- It means a lot.

 

 

 

RGC: Strike Branding

Another contribution from Ron Garza’s video collection, this clip features Ron performing a strike branding on a client’s neck. The popularity of strike branding- applying heated metal to the skin to burn the tissue and form a controlled scar- has waned in the years since the introduction of more predictable forms of scarification like ESU branding and cutting with flesh removal.

You can find out more about Ron via his website.

This video is dated somewhere between 1995-1997.

Extreme Edgeplay: Mercury Sounding

sacreddebrismercury

The full import is finally complete on SUBINCISION FUN, the video originally submitted to the spcOnline site in 1996/7 by my friend JM 1 2, who was one of the most fascinating and genuine modification fans I met through Ken Schein’s UNIQUE mailing list during the tenure of my subscription. He was a renaissance man and a true gentleman, preferring to “not cuss around Ladies” and giving his lecture on ‘Tens Units for Pain Management in Body Modification’ at the 1999 ModCon event using the word doodlehanger in place of penis as not to offend.

When we started corresponding his letter usually derailed quickly from our modification talk and we’d share stories of travel, kinky sex and adventure. J was an edge player who got into modification through sexual exploration; if putting things in your penis felt good, he reasoned, it would make sense to split the underside open to expose even more of the sensitive urethra. He recorded his adventures- photographs, VHS tapes and plaster molds of his cutting progress which he’d share with other modification fans he met along the way.

One of the most hardcore bits of play from his contribution was- and I can’t emphasize do not try this at home enough– urethral sounding with a ballon filled with mercury 3. He claimed to have been turned on by the surging of the mercury inside of his penis. A rubber band was tied to the balloon and secured over his glans to avoid the balloon going further than expected.

This short clip features him inserting the balloon in his urethra. I’ve seen this footage dozens of times and it still makes fills me with a nervous awe.

Sandbox members: the extended edit is up for you folks. Enjoy!

Notes:

  1. J: Subincision Interview
  2. J: Story of a Subincision
  3. Symptoms of mercury poisoning include: tremors; emotional changes (e.g., mood swings, irritability, nervousness, excessive shyness); insomnia; neuromuscular changes (such as weakness, muscle atrophy, twitching); headaches; disturbances in sensations; changes in nerve responses; performance deficits on tests of cognitive function. At higher exposures there may be kidney effects, respiratory failure and death.