Category Archives: Ron Garza

Native Urges 1997

In 2014 the Sacred Debris project received a generous donation of 1990s/early 2000s video cassettes from influential piercer/scarification artist/suspension practitioner Ron Garza chronicling the early years of his career. In late 2016 we’re going to roll out a sponsorship campaign (an ‘adopt a cassette’ if you will) to help permanently preserve, archive and share Ron’s contributions.

This video from 1997 features Ron, Steve Joyner (who’s celebrating his 46th birthday today) and a host of other performers in a piece called NATIVE URGES. My intention was to cut it down to ‘best of’ clips but ultimately decided to publish it in it’s original run time.

Enjoy.

ScarWars Two: Lotus

scarwars(974)

scarwars972

According to my external hard drive “Wintermute” there are somewhere around 1,500 official photos from the ScarWars2 event that took place in February of 2006. That’s not counting the photos from artists/clients/attendees that I’ve never seen.

These images- #974 and #972 from event photographer Atom Moore- features Ron Garza working on a client’s back with the assistance of Thorsten Sekira.

http://www.rongarza.com

[email protected]

swperk

Ten years ago today I was nervously pacing in a Port Richmond 1 warehouse, hoping that the months of planning the inaugural Scarwars event- from assembling the artists, hand picking the attendees, making sure the photographers had what they needed and praying that the warehouse owner believed my ‘we’re shooting pornography, please give us our privacy’ cover story- would be enough to make sure that the weekend would go off without a hitch.

05SW100We made some amazing memories that weekend; the artists made some beautiful scars and while there were some glitches (the gentleman walking around dripping blood comes to mind) by and large it ended up being one of the most laid back events I’ve ever hosted. In the decade that followed we’ve seen decorative scarification flourish; while not getting the same widespread acceptance that tattooing and body piercing are currently enjoying people are finally starting to come around to the idea that a cutting isn’t always mutilation and that sometimes our scars make us stronger. I hope that in some small way we had something to do with that.

I’ve asked SW1 staff, artists 2 and guests to share a memory from the event- here are their stories:

Angela (Medical Liaison)
As someone who was relatively new to the BME community and also now as “modified” as others, this event was extremely inclusive. I attended as a spectator as well as someone on the medical/biohazard team. A very distinct memory, may it be good or bad, was of a young gentleman who had just got some work done and was walking around shirtless. He happen to drip blood EVERYWHERE. I followed the blood trail to him, cleaning up as I went. Finally as I got to him, I drew a circle on the floor and told him he wasn’t allowed outside of the circle…. Over the years of scar wars, this def happened less and less as people were much more aware of themselves… But that was the first… Oh yeah, and I was topless for most of it.

Brian (Staff Fixer)
perkperkWhen you asked us to look back at the inaugural Scar Wars, I literally had to go through pictures and re-read diary entries to jog my memory. After being flooded with nostalgia and thoughts of “I miss them”, I searched for what it was like those important days. It was hectic. I remember being the first ones there and the last to leave almost everyday. My role in the event was a catch all. I documented what I could, helped wherever possible, and most of all was privileged to witness amazing humans enduring painful experiences that ended with huge smiles. Being part of the chaos was grueling at the time, but come 10 years later it stands out as a defining moment of my life. i also can’t believe how many titties there were.

Kathleen† (Staff)
My memories of Scar Wars are mostly about the people who attended. Many friends from around the world who I was meeting for the first time or seeing together in one place when they usually were so far apart. I had seen scarification done many times, but not in such a concentrated group of skilled practitioners, and it was great to walk around the room and watch them all work. The collaborative spirit was something that struck me as well- so many artists with different styles and techniques, all willing to share information and learn from one another. It and the subsequent Scar Wars events are some of the most positive memories I have of any body modification event I’ve ever attended.

Jesse Villemaire (Scarification Artist)
Scar Wars had so many great memories! 10 years later and I’m still proud to be friends with many of these great artists.  I remember connecting with Ron Garza immediately as he put a camera crew in my face to interview me as soon as I arrived. Ron then made me comfortable and allowed me to ask as many stupid questions as I needed too in order to excel my techniques.

I also had the honor of collaborating with Brian Decker on a large bamboo scar piece on Corinna’s back. Corinna dealt with every emotion possible as many friends were coaching her through this intense project…still so unreal. It wasn’t just about cutting people, it was about bonding on a level that’s hard to describe.

The enjoyment of learning with many others, realizing there’s multiple ways to create a scar, watching Dave create “shading” with his cross hatching technique, seeing other artists collaborating for the very first time…it was all very inspiring.

Scar Wars is a significant part of our history. Thanks Shawn for having a vision that brought so many talented people from around the world to showcase the art we were truly passionate about.

Ryan Ouellette (Scarification Artist)
Scar Wars was the first time that I felt like I was part of a larger scarification community and that I really had colleagues in it. I knew there were other people out there doing it and getting it but I was in this little bubble of only seeing my pieces and only knowing my techniques and aftercare. Being able to watch other people doing it really helped me expand my own methods. I grew a lot from that experience and scarification really came into its own as a respectable art form, rather than just an internet fad.

Allen Falkner (Photographer)
So many fond memories form that weekend. Sadly most stories cannot be shared with the public due the nature of the indiscretions and the people involved.

Julie (Guest)
SWJULEScar Wars was an intensely personal experience among friends and strangers, unique in a way that doesn’t feel possible anymore. I got cut at Scar Wars and love it ten years later, but it was not the most memorable thing about the event. What I remember most was an inherent trust in the people I was surrounded by that I’ve since learned is rare. It is hard to put succinctly into words how this event (and others like it) helped me personally grow. I’ll leave it to a simple thank you to everyone involved.

Shawn Porter: (Host)
shawnscarwarsThe first Scarwars was fun. It was supposed to be serious, life changing, important.. but more than anything it was fun. The staff worked overtime (literally) to make sure that by the time I walked in the door everything had been taken care of so I was free just to enjoy myself and have a good time. Everything lined up perfectly and I was humbled to be part of something that meant as much to the artists and guests as it did for me.

Notes:

  1. Port Richmond is a neighborhood in North Philadelphia, several miles from the downtown area.
  2. The artists at the first ScarWars were Ron Garza, Dave Gilstrap, Vampy, Monte, Jesse Villemaire, Brian Decker and Ryan Ouellette

RGC: Strike Branding

Another contribution from Ron Garza’s video collection, this clip features Ron performing a strike branding on a client’s neck. The popularity of strike branding- applying heated metal to the skin to burn the tissue and form a controlled scar- has waned in the years since the introduction of more predictable forms of scarification like ESU branding and cutting with flesh removal.

You can find out more about Ron via his website.

This video is dated somewhere between 1995-1997.

The artist as client

CUTThere’s something about watching a tongue splitting procedure that always gets me. The squinty eyes, the drool, the client’s eventual “mo, I’m thine. It dothent thurt ath bad ath i sthought” when the practitioner is finally done and everything is rinsed out.

This procedure, on scarification luminary Ron Garza, dates back to the mid/late 1990s and originally ran on the spcOnline site.

It’s been a fun 2014 for Sacred Debris. I’m in the process of writing the “What happens next” 2015 post and while I don’t know which direction I’m taking the blog (options include offline, infrequently updated or required tips for videos) I want to thank everyone who’s taken the time to comment, email questions, reblog our articles and dropped a few dolllars in the donation box. You folks made me keep updating for the silent majority and I truly appreciate your passion for the project.

SP

 

 

RGC: Palm Branding

Without a doubt, having my palms tattooed was the single most painful tattoo experience I’ve ever had. Any other infamously sensitive spot: ribs, armpits, inner thighs or throat I’d gladly do again to never have to experience the sensation of having my palms poked.

While putting this video together I couldn’t help but remember the pain and to commiserate with the gentleman whose palm Ron was branding. I can only imagine the hellish healing process.

Ron Garza is an internationally recognized and respected Body Modification artist currently in California, USA. He travels constantly in the role of body piercer, modification and scarification artist, lecturer and teacher. He’s been generous enough to share his collection with the Sacred Debris project, so check his tag for more.

He can be reached via his website: http://www.rongarza.com