Category Archives: History

Like Moths to a Flame (NSFW)

Anthony Alan Oversby, called Alan or Mr. Sebastian, was tattoo artist and body piercer and was a key nodal figure in the popularization of body piercing in the UK. Seeing pierced nipples on fieldhands 1 ignited his interest in body piercing, In 1976, Alan left his position as an art teacher, and traveled across the US, working with Sailor Sid Diller and others to further educate himself as a tattoo artist. Continue reading

Notes:

  1. “Fascinated by the gold rings that glittered in the nipples of field hands, he made persistent enquiries which were eventually rewarded with an exciting midnight visit to the local piercer.” – Obiturary, Independent.

Bud Larsen Zodiac- Capricorn

In the late 1970s, illustrator Bud Larsen contributed distinctive line-art illustrations to magazines that would go on to become synonymous with the subcultures they documented; forty-plus years later PFIQ and Drummer have become the defacto reference points for folks researching the history of body piercing and gay leather culture respectively. Bud provided cover art for both of their inaugural issues, with interior illustrations that in my mind are as intrinsic to their visual identity as Al Hirschfeld’s similar but decidedly less erotic drawings were to the New Yorker.

While most of Bud’s Drummer work was in their DRUM BEATS section, he also contributed several representatives to their Zodiac series -an S&M sign of the zodiacal times – like this Capricorn 1 Vol1 No4 1976.

Other signs by Bud:

Taurus- Vol1 Issue 2.
Scorpio- Vol1 Issue 3.
Capricorn- Vol1 Issue 4.
Aries- Vol1 Issue 5.
Cancer- Vol1 Issue 7.

 

Notes:

  1. Capricorn Facts: Often calm, to the degree of appearing slightly cold, meticulous and dogged in their persistence for quality and productivity, Capricorn individuals are often a notch above their counterparts. Source – https://www.ganeshaspeaks.com/zodiac-signs/capricorn/facts 

Losing a Hand- continued. (NSFW)

I first met Ed Cushman in Toronto. I could tell right away that Ed was going to have an amazing story to tell; in 2002 his remarkable story was published in the form of LOSING A HAND, a 96pg book published by BMEBooks, in which Ed documents first coming in contact with amputee fetishists, his own desire to remove his hand, and the process of removing it with a power saw.

Losing a Hand- Ed Cushman. 2002 BMEBooks.

I recently got in touch with Ed, and was excited to have him offer an update on his modifications since our last meeting.


My present modification condition has changed after some 12 years since I came to the gathering in Toronto. I was initially invited I believe, because I had purposely cut off my hand some 25 years earlier because I thought it would be interesting to be a one-handed person.

Living as a one-hander hasn’t been a problem after almost 40 years.

Then I became interested in body modification and decided to remove the glans from my penis. I first divided it in half, then removed the two halves. This took probably a year, allowing for healing stages. I got invited to Toronto, probably because of my hand removal and writing a book about it. There was a person there who was doing various surgical modifications for those at the conference, and I had him trim up the end of my penis, as it was rather ragged after my own surgical work. This left me with a penile shaft with a smooth blunt end. Continue reading

Needlenose and Thread

Dale, 1977. Tattoos by Cliff Raven. Photo by Robin Ryan.

Dale’s nipple piercings were done by Buddy Mcfall at Chicago Tattoo Company when it was at 900 Belmont. Buddy performed the piercing with a pair of needle-nose pliers with needle and thread, and Dale had to move the thread back and forth through the piercings during healing. Piercing wasn’t always welcome at early tattoo conventions, so walking around displaying pierced nipples must have caused a few raised eyebrows.

Eizo Mamiya

I first met Eizo Mamiya in Amsterdam (where this photo was taken) in 1995. We’d meet again in Toronto at the first MODCON event a few years later in 1999. He was a frequent travel partner of Japanese modification documentarian Ryoichi Maeda.

Eizo began piercing himself in the late 1980s, and is recognized as one of Japan’s earliest piercing professionals.

Continue reading

How we learn, How we teach

Apprentice: Lynn Loheide, 2013.

A History of Apprenticeships.


“I want to be a piercer! How do I get an apprenticeship? Where do I learn to pierce?”

 This desire has been expressed by thousands of people over the recent past. What was once something barely thought of as a viable career blossomed into a huge, multifaceted industry in the last few decades. As if out of nowhere, piercing became a legitimate job one could make a comfortable living at. But the path to get there has been as ever-changing as the industry itself. You don’t go to school to become a piercer, there’s no classes or degree you can hold in body piercing. Traditionally, like many other crafts, piercing has been trained by masters, to apprentices. Someone already skilled at the craft takes a beginner under their wing and shows them the craft one on one. But how did we get there? Where did the first piercers come from? How did the apprenticeship evolve to what it is today?

Continue reading

BSTA: Kristian

Ari – How did you get started with your sheep?

Kristian – Well I grew up in Tahoe. I’m not really a city person. I spent years in San Francisco and then San Diego but I get severe depression if I’m living in a city – I just can’t deal. I’m fine living rural – I do much better. I’ve always wanted a piece of land. I traveled all over the world, seen a lot of stuff, and always wanted a mini-farm. To be self-sufficient and raise my own food. I’m a plant freak; it takes me an hour just to water everything in the summer. I’ve specifically always wanted Soay sheep. They’re a primitive breed from the neolithic time. Continue reading

Uncovered: PFIQ Issue 13

PFIQ Magazine cover, issue 13.

©Gauntlet Enterprises

“A regular contributor to the magazine was a local gay artist who went by the name of Bud. His work occupied thirteen of the first fourteen covers and after we went to color appeared regularly inside. I had seen his work in the gay S/M magazine Drummer. How we actually met and connected, I’ve forgotten. I do remember that he did some tattoo designs for some clients of Cliff Raven, a T&P group regular. Bud’s imaginative pen and ink drawings show the strong influence of both comic and early fantasy and sci-fi art.”

-Jim Ward. 1

Continue reading

Sailor Sid & Banana

I hope everyone is staying as safe as possible with the worldwide covid19 outbreak; I know a lot of us are currently waiting it out and social distancing in the safety of our own homes, but to the folks on the front lines – medical personnel, first responders, food service, grocers, and online retailers – you have our most sincere gratitude.

I’ve been trying to be productive during the SI phase of the pandemic, working on articles for the upcoming Nodal Points IV, working on a presentation that may be released online called THE DOCUMENTED BODY- Documenting piercing documentation, and trying to maintain balance when everything’s topsy turvy, so I’ll try to update Sacred a little more frequently during the next few weeks.

This photo brings us back to a happier time, late 1970s, in the London, England shop of Alan ‘Mr. Sebastian’ Oversby, and features Sailor Sid Diller and Banana.

Bud Larsen Zodiac- Cancer

In the late 1970s, illustrator Bud Larsen contributed distinctive line-art illustrations to magazines that would go on to become synonymous with the subcultures they documented; forty-plus years later PFIQ and Drummer have become the defacto reference points for folks researching the history of body piercing and gay leather culture respectively. Bud provided cover art for both of their inaugural issues, with interior illustrations that in my mind are as intrinsic to their visual identity as Al Hirschfeld’s similar but decidedly less erotic drawings were to the New Yorker.

While most of Bud’s Drummer work was in their DRUM BEATS section, he also contributed several representatives to their Zodiac series -an S&M sign of the zodiacal times – like this Cancer 1 illo from the seventh issue. (1976)

Other signs by Bud:

Taurus- Vol1 Issue 2.
Scorpio- Vol1 Issue 3.
Capricorn- Vol1 Issue 4.
Aries- Vol1 Issue 5.
Cancer- Vol1 Issue 7.

 

Notes:

  1. Cancer Facts: Protective, artistic, rebellious, loyal, lie detector, intuitive, self-conscious, sensitive, insecure, visionary, clingy, thoughtful lover. Source – https://www.ganeshaspeaks.com/zodiac-signs/cancer/facts