Category Archives: Events

BSTA: Darryl Carlton (Divinity P. Fudge)

Ari – Where did you first meet Ron (Athey)?

Divinity – I met Ron at Cuffs – it was the premier leather spot, a dark little place but not very big.  It was very macho and leather, and I was drawn to that masculinity. I was just hanging out and Terry, my drag mother, it’s where he went out, so one night I went with him, and then after a while I went on my own. One night Ron came in and we met each other and started talking. We were both reading Dennis Cooper at the time. 

Ari – Can you tell us about Dennis Cooper?

Divinity – Dennis Cooper was a gay writer- he did a lot of writing about being gay and how to maneuver in society and being true to yourself. He did a lot of really cool exposé on gay life. He was from California and that was interesting to me because for some strange reason I’d always found the idea of going to California really attractive. Something was always telling me to go there but I didn’t know what it was. Once I got there I realized what it was; it was a place I needed to be. All the places I’d been before like New Orleans and Michigan were conservative and moving out to California was really freeing for me. It was like, “oh, possibilities are endless out here!” It was a lot of good reading for me. I read a lot of Brion Gysin as well. A lot of people were like, “you’re black, why are you reading that?” I was like “I don’t know!” It was just really interesting to me. Continue reading

#fakirforever

I was chatting with Blake Perlingieri about Fakir and his impact on the body modification community; Blake is someone who very much embodies the spirit of Fakir’s Modern Primitives and we’re excited that he’s going to be spending some time with Ari for a BSTA interview soon. With that in mind, to celebrate what would have been Fakir’s 88th birthday, I thought this photo of the two of them, borrowed from Nomad’s Instagram account, would be a nice way to remember him.

We tried to do a lot of cleaning up on this video that a friend of Blake’s shot at the APP Conference in Las Vegas a few years back, but the sound just didn’t want to cooperate. Still, it’s worth checking out for those of us who want to soak up as much of our history as possible.

Enjoy, and happy birthday, Fakir.

 

Piercing in Performance Walkthrough (pt2)

GoPro cameras are not designed to use them like I tried to use them at this year’s APP Conference. Too shaky, audio is terrible but at least Ron Athey is ever-charming. Ron discusses the work of artist Jon John in this second clip from his walkthrough of the Body Piercing Archive’s 2018 exhibit on the intersection of Body Piercing and Performance Art.

 

Piercing in Performance Walkthrough (pt1)

Over the last several years, one of the biggest highlights of the annual Association of Professional Piercers Conference and Exposition has been the exhibits curated by the Body Piercing Archive; while we’re blessed to have a seemingly limitless amount of virtual space for the preservation of material documenting body modification there is something to be said for the tangible experience of seeing these reliquaries in person.

For the 2018 Conference, the BPA 1 curated an exhibit on the intersection of body piercing and performance art featuring familiar names like Ron Athey, TSD, CoRE, Genesis P-Orridge, Bob Flanagan, Stelarc, Jon John and a host of others. Ron and collaborator Divinity P. Fudge were on hand as guest docents, joining BPA’s Paul King, TSD’s Allen Falkner, CoRE’s Steve Joyner, Dr. Dominic Johnson and Dr. Julian Carter on guided tours of the Perforated Body.

This clip features Ron Athey and Darryl Carlton (Divinity P. Fudge) on their first exhibit walkthrough.

BSTA: Curt Warren

Curt Warren and Erin Figureoa, The Piercing Elf, APP 1999.

Curt – Let me tell you a little bit about my start, I know all your interviews start with that.  I grew up in Ogden, Utah, which is about forty miles outside Salt Lake City.  I started having ear piercings around middle school – I got influenced by heavy metal so I thought, “fuck, I gotta have my ears pierced now!”  After high school I moved to Maui, Hawaii, and while I was living over there a friend of mine got back after having spent the summer in New York.  We were having coffee and she was eating soup, and I kept hearing this clank!  I asked,  “what the hell is that noise?”  And she said, “oh, it’s my tongue piercing!”  This was around 1993, and she showed it to me, and I’d never seen one, or even considered it for that matter!  I became very fixated with it, fascinated by it, and decided I had to have one or else I couldn’t live anymore!  The closest place for me to get one was in Honolulu on Oahu.  This woman who called herself “The Piercing Elf” had a little piercing only studio there, so I flew out, rented a car, and failed to check her hours.  I spent a lot of money to fly out there and hang out and fly back to Maui without a tongue piercing.  So I saved up and a few months later I flew back out, made sure to check her hours first this time, and got it done.  The experience for me – not being involved with the industry, not having any tattoos and only having some ear piercings – I was rather intimidated by her.  She was sleeved and had a lot of piercings, but she had a great bedside manner, which made me feel comfortable.  My first professional piercing experience was a piercing only studio with good jewelry and good bedside manner. Continue reading

Ready to Wear: May the 4th

Happy May the 4th (be with you) everyone!
Georgia based artist Jason Craig was our go-to artist for event branding throughout the 2000s; in 2005 he designed this Star Wars/Liberty Bell Mashup t-shirt for the inaugural ScarWars event in Philadelphia. It was printed in two styles; on a black t-shirt and on a grey raglan t-shirt.

The shirts were available for pre-order and at the event, and never reprinted.

Scarwars event fixer Brian Sowden and host Shawn Porter, 2005

BSTA: Bethrah Szumski

Ari – Did you feel like going through a tattoo apprenticeship, and being so enmeshed in the tattoo industry, influenced you as a piercer?

Bethrah – Oh yeah, it influenced the entire piercing community in some really interesting ways that people don’t know. I think they’re really different sensibilities – I think there are some interesting up and down sides of both disciplines. The downside of tattooing is you’re judged exclusively for your capacity to make really beautiful art, or really interesting art, and how well you’re applying it to the skin. But you’re not necessarily critiqued on other aspects of what you do like health and safety and general sanitation; the burden of you as a professional isn’t placed on that. You can do amazing art and just be the most dirty, grimy tattoo artist and people aren’t going to worry about it very much. You won’t get blasted for it in the community. I see that in tattoo shops – I can’t even tell you how many times the owner has been super proud and their shop is really beautiful, but the biohazard is in a closet on the way to the bathroom where from a health and safety perspective it’s like, “Oh this place is horrible! I would never get tattooed here.” – but they’re famous! Granted these are sweeping generalizations, and not always the case. There are plenty of tattoo artists who are amazing who are super clean and conscientious and have well thought out studios in all aspects of what they’re doing. It’s just a pitfall based on what’s considered a value. It’s almost the opposite on the piercing end. People are so heavily critiqued on their method that the aesthetic of what they’re doing is almost completely under-addressed. Does it look straight or does it seem even can be addressed at times but whether or not it’s on the right place in the body falls by the wayside. I had this discussion with a guy from Russia – is it art or is it technique? – and I said it’s both. If you don’t know about art or understand color theory and don’t understand spacial perception and composition, it shows in your work. It’s clear in your work if you don’t have these things. Continue reading

APP Conference 2018 Highlight: XXX History of Piercing (part 2): Pierced Men of Porn


The class schedule and registration portal for the 2018 Association of Professional Piercers annual Conference and Expo has gone live,  and with only four months until showtime attendees are no doubt weighing the plusses and minuses of each offering to fully maximize their time in Las Vegas.

Health, safety, and technique classes probably top the list of most requested , but the APP also offers a selection of anthropology and culture classes that should be considered can’t miss opportunities for anyone interested in the who/what/where/when/why of body piercing. Continue reading

Knux: Scarwars 2005

It’s been thirteen years since we held the first Scarwars event in Philadelphia. Over the years, both on the (now defunct) Scarwars blog and here on Sacred we’ve posted tons of pics from the event(s) and there are still hundreds that have never gone online. Like this photo by SW1 photographer Allen Falkner of Dave Gillstrap working on a cutting with removal.

The design is a mashup of an anatomical heart and a set of brass knuckles; Dave contributed t-shirt designs for the first two events- one featuring an anatomical heart, the other brass knuckles.

 

 

BSTA: Séan McManus


Ari – Sean, I always have everyone do a standard introduction to kick these off, so give us a brief bio.

Sean – I’m old, I’ve been everywhere. Ok, so brief history of Sean in bod-mod. Started with Sadistic Sundays at the video bar in 1990, roughly. I think it was right after high school – I was eighteen. Was doing that for a little bit, was just a Sunday night show type thing, and then left town for a while doing the hippie soul searching whatever, did Ren Fairs for a summer just to get away. When I came back Allen Falkner had moved back to Dallas and he and I became friends. I was hanging out with Allen, helping him paint his first room in his first studio when he was just renting space from a furniture store. He rented a room from them which soon turned into a piercing empire. We hung out for another couple years there in Dallas where I helped him attempt his first suspension, which was fishing line and just a ton of piercings. It was absolutely horrible. It lasted like three seconds – the fishing line started to snag and pull through because it was so thin. We look at it now like what the hell were we thinking? But you experiment, you figure shit out. At that time Fakir wasn’t as willing to share the suspension information with Allen; he did later, so until then there was a lot of us just looking at videos and guessing. Continue reading