Category Archives: Better Safe than Ari

BSTA: Collected Interviews Vol2 pre-order.

 

We’ve finally got the second collected volume of Better Safe than Ari interviews ready to be sent off to the printers; this double size black and white books features interviews with:

Mark Seitchik.
Mic Rawls.
Tom Brazda.
Scott Shatsky.
Sean McManus.
Ken Dean.
David Vidra.
Bethrah Szumski.
Curt Warren.

– and for this edition, a never before published interview with retired piercer Sean Christian.

It comes wrapped in a cover featuring a vintage Gauntlet NYC photo by iconic community photographer/documentarian Efrain Gonzalez and should be ready to ship before Christmas.

Support print media, support Sacred Debris!

Available for pre-order here: https://hexappeal.storenvy.com/products/24016416-better-safe-than-ari-collected-interviews-vol-2

BSTA: Darryl Carlton (Divinity P. Fudge)

Ari – Where did you first meet Ron (Athey)?

Divinity – I met Ron at Cuffs – it was the premier leather spot, a dark little place but not very big.  It was very macho and leather, and I was drawn to that masculinity. I was just hanging out and Terry, my drag mother, it’s where he went out, so one night I went with him, and then after a while I went on my own. One night Ron came in and we met each other and started talking. We were both reading Dennis Cooper at the time. 

Ari – Can you tell us about Dennis Cooper?

Divinity – Dennis Cooper was a gay writer- he did a lot of writing about being gay and how to maneuver in society and being true to yourself. He did a lot of really cool exposé on gay life. He was from California and that was interesting to me because for some strange reason I’d always found the idea of going to California really attractive. Something was always telling me to go there but I didn’t know what it was. Once I got there I realized what it was; it was a place I needed to be. All the places I’d been before like New Orleans and Michigan were conservative and moving out to California was really freeing for me. It was like, “oh, possibilities are endless out here!” It was a lot of good reading for me. I read a lot of Brion Gysin as well. A lot of people were like, “you’re black, why are you reading that?” I was like “I don’t know!” It was just really interesting to me. Continue reading

2018 APP Conference exclusive BSTAV2

We’re working overtime to get the second print volume of Better Safe than Ari interviews ready for this year’s APP Conference and Expo in Las Vegas with a convention exclusive PURPLE AS ALL HELL edition that will be released a few weeks ahead of the standard version. The cover design isn’t finalized and is subject to change. But it will still be PURPLE AS ALL HELL.

The second volume features interviews with:

  • Mark Seitchik.
  • Mic Rawls.
  • Tom Brazda.
  • Scott Shatsky.
  • Sean McManus.
  • Ken Dean.
  • David Vidra.
  • Bethrah Szumski.
  • Curt Warren.

.. and if we get it ready in time a bonus interview.

The regular edition pre-order will be available in late July 2018. If you’re going to be attending this year’s APP Conference and would like a copy of the Vegas exclusive: click here.

BSTA: Curt Warren

Curt Warren and Erin Figureoa, The Piercing Elf, APP 1999.

Curt – Let me tell you a little bit about my start, I know all your interviews start with that.  I grew up in Ogden, Utah, which is about forty miles outside Salt Lake City.  I started having ear piercings around middle school – I got influenced by heavy metal so I thought, “fuck, I gotta have my ears pierced now!”  After high school I moved to Maui, Hawaii, and while I was living over there a friend of mine got back after having spent the summer in New York.  We were having coffee and she was eating soup, and I kept hearing this clank!  I asked,  “what the hell is that noise?”  And she said, “oh, it’s my tongue piercing!”  This was around 1993, and she showed it to me, and I’d never seen one, or even considered it for that matter!  I became very fixated with it, fascinated by it, and decided I had to have one or else I couldn’t live anymore!  The closest place for me to get one was in Honolulu on Oahu.  This woman who called herself “The Piercing Elf” had a little piercing only studio there, so I flew out, rented a car, and failed to check her hours.  I spent a lot of money to fly out there and hang out and fly back to Maui without a tongue piercing.  So I saved up and a few months later I flew back out, made sure to check her hours first this time, and got it done.  The experience for me – not being involved with the industry, not having any tattoos and only having some ear piercings – I was rather intimidated by her.  She was sleeved and had a lot of piercings, but she had a great bedside manner, which made me feel comfortable.  My first professional piercing experience was a piercing only studio with good jewelry and good bedside manner. Continue reading

BSTA: Bethrah Szumski

Ari – Did you feel like going through a tattoo apprenticeship, and being so enmeshed in the tattoo industry, influenced you as a piercer?

Bethrah – Oh yeah, it influenced the entire piercing community in some really interesting ways that people don’t know. I think they’re really different sensibilities – I think there are some interesting up and down sides of both disciplines. The downside of tattooing is you’re judged exclusively for your capacity to make really beautiful art, or really interesting art, and how well you’re applying it to the skin. But you’re not necessarily critiqued on other aspects of what you do like health and safety and general sanitation; the burden of you as a professional isn’t placed on that. You can do amazing art and just be the most dirty, grimy tattoo artist and people aren’t going to worry about it very much. You won’t get blasted for it in the community. I see that in tattoo shops – I can’t even tell you how many times the owner has been super proud and their shop is really beautiful, but the biohazard is in a closet on the way to the bathroom where from a health and safety perspective it’s like, “Oh this place is horrible! I would never get tattooed here.” – but they’re famous! Granted these are sweeping generalizations, and not always the case. There are plenty of tattoo artists who are amazing who are super clean and conscientious and have well thought out studios in all aspects of what they’re doing. It’s just a pitfall based on what’s considered a value. It’s almost the opposite on the piercing end. People are so heavily critiqued on their method that the aesthetic of what they’re doing is almost completely under-addressed. Does it look straight or does it seem even can be addressed at times but whether or not it’s on the right place in the body falls by the wayside. I had this discussion with a guy from Russia – is it art or is it technique? – and I said it’s both. If you don’t know about art or understand color theory and don’t understand spacial perception and composition, it shows in your work. It’s clear in your work if you don’t have these things. Continue reading

BSTA: David Vidra


Ari: I always like to kick these off with an introduction, so tell us a little about you, Mama. 

Vidra: My introduction to the industry was 1978. I met a gentleman by the name of Linus Herrell and he owned a store in Cleveland called Body Language and that store, how do you explain it? It’s like one of the first alternative bookstores.  We didn’t sell any porn, nothing like that, but it had a rubber room and a leather room, where there were all different types of books and little novelties and stuff like that. Also, he had a piercing room. He had magazines like PFIQ, the whole nine yards and I was like, “OK, this is fascinating.” I met him when he was a bartender at one of the little leather bars in Cleveland, in fact the oldest one in Ohio. He had a huge bull’s tether in his septum, and I was just staring at him, because number one it was very attractive and number two I was like, “hmm, how did you do that? How did he get something that thick into his septum?”  I asked him a couple of questions. He explained it to me, explained the process of stretching and piercing.  When I asked him where do you get something like that done he said he’d gotten work done at the Gauntlet in L.A. by a gentlemen called Jim Ward. That was my first introduction to Gauntlet, and even that was through Linus.  He told me about PFIQ and the new shop he’d be opening, etc etc, and then in his psychotic manner he said, “So what are you doing tonight? I get off in two hours.” I said, “eh, probably just going home” and he said, “Well let’s go home and fuck”, and I’m like, “okay.” Now realize back then I was working for a Catholic Church.  I was the rectory cook, as well as directing theatre for the deaf and blind and just about any other handicap you can imagine and normal people all on the same stage.  It was a lot of work, it was a lot of fun, and I loved doing it.  That’s what I did for a living back then. Cooking for a church rectory for the priests and the nuns who ran the Hunger Center in a pretty impoverished area of Cleveland, but it was also the deaf and the blind center for the Diocese of Cleveland. I had worked with almost all types of disabilities really from the time I was 13. Continue reading

BSTA: Ken Dean

Ari – Ken, where are you currently located?

Ken – I just moved to Seattle Tattoo Emporium. All these dudes have been there thirty fucking years, like Jimmy the Saint, it’s crazy. It’s also a tattoo museum so they’ve got all this really old shit. Lyle Tuttle will just stop by like, “hey whats up guys?” Old school legendary shit. I don’t really make a lot of money there, but for the experience alone it’s fuckin worth it. I’m not having that bad of a time. I can come and go as I please, I only have a small set schedule. No drama. So many times it’s just stupid shit, but you know how the business is, it’s a constant barrage of bullshit that I would rather not deal with on any level. That’s why I love where I’m working now, because there’s none. These dudes are my fuckin age, they don’t wanna do anything besides go to work, be happy, and come home, and I love this! No drama, no shit, no nothing, I’m good with it. I talk to friends who are really young in the business and it’s all he did this, she did that, blah blah blah, I just don’t fucking care, I couldn’t care less to hear about piercing/tattoo shop drama, it’s just endless. I can’t even go out to a bar without someone coming up and going “Are you a tattoo artist? Let me tell you what I want!” Continue reading

BSTA: Séan McManus


Ari – Sean, I always have everyone do a standard introduction to kick these off, so give us a brief bio.

Sean – I’m old, I’ve been everywhere. Ok, so brief history of Sean in bod-mod. Started with Sadistic Sundays at the video bar in 1990, roughly. I think it was right after high school – I was eighteen. Was doing that for a little bit, was just a Sunday night show type thing, and then left town for a while doing the hippie soul searching whatever, did Ren Fairs for a summer just to get away. When I came back Allen Falkner had moved back to Dallas and he and I became friends. I was hanging out with Allen, helping him paint his first room in his first studio when he was just renting space from a furniture store. He rented a room from them which soon turned into a piercing empire. We hung out for another couple years there in Dallas where I helped him attempt his first suspension, which was fishing line and just a ton of piercings. It was absolutely horrible. It lasted like three seconds – the fishing line started to snag and pull through because it was so thin. We look at it now like what the hell were we thinking? But you experiment, you figure shit out. At that time Fakir wasn’t as willing to share the suspension information with Allen; he did later, so until then there was a lot of us just looking at videos and guessing. Continue reading

BSTA: Scott Shatsky


Scott Shatsky may not be the most recognizable names in piercing, but his roots run deep – from being a young man hanging around the original Gauntlet, to apprenticing under Jim Ward and being part of the original Gauntlet San Fransisco crew, Scott offers some wonderful insight into that early pivotal time. Scott remains part of that quiet faction who was more enamored with piercing as an intimate movement, and gives us some new perspective on those Gauntlet years as a client, manager, and Master Piercer.


Ari – Where does piercing start for you, Scott?

Scott – I grew up in Los Angeles, and I always had a fascination with anything other than just being white, so tattoos and piercings fell into that. I was just always very interested, so in high school and even before I was a punk rock kid I was always sticking needles in me for piercings. I don’t even remember how I found Gauntlet, but it was in West Hollywood. I walked in and I became friends with Jim (Ward) and became pretty good friends with Cross, who I share a birthday with. I was a young kid. I wasn’t even in a place where I could get pierced there, age-wise. Cross was only a couple of years older than I was at the time. I have this picture of me sitting there with Jim and his beautiful silver and purple peacock wallpaper in the piercing studio when he was piercing my cartilage. So my identity in that world started years before I was piercing. Continue reading

Back to Zines

Happy New Year, everyone, and happy fourth anniversary to Sacred Debris!
It’s been a heck of a run so far, and I’m hoping that we can do fun things in 2018.

One of the best additions to the blog in 2017 were the BETTER SAFE THAN ARI interviews that Ari Pimsler has been working on; he’s managed to chat with a pretty impressive lineup of current and former body piercers so far, and our list for the new year is already shaping up to be something special. Getting these memories recorded is very much at the heart of what our goal is here at SD, and with that in mind we’re going to be rolling out a print edition of the BSTA interviews. It’s currently in the pre-order phase over at our online store (HEXAPPEAL) and should be ready in no time at all.

Volume One of the collection contains interviews with:

  • Tod Almighty
  • Dana Dinius
  • Warren Hiller
  • Paul King
  • Gregg Marchessault
  • Sean Philips
  • Jim Sens

The book is a 64 page softcover trade paperback with minimal photos; we really wanted the interviews to speak for themselves. You can preorder it here: Better Safe than Ari: Collected Sacred Debris Interviews Vol. 1.